News

New Kitchen Notes up now! Read about soup and soups.


BUMPER CROP OF POTATOES AND ONIONS

This season has seen The Organic Farm’s best year for potatoes and onions. We also happen to think they’re some of the best of their type around, and invite you to read a short piece with more information and details of pricing. 


ORGANIC FARM GETS MENTION IN NEWFOUNDLAND COOKBOOK

The farm was delighted to see we received a mention in St John’s chef Mark McCrowe’s new book (“Island Kitchen: An Ode to Newfoundland”). We’re grateful for Mark’s compliments. To read the passage in question click here.


2ND BEACHY COVE BROWNIES VISIT FARM

The farm was delighted to recently host the 2nd Beachy Cove Brownies brigade. They enjoyed a farm tour from Oz in spite of the rain, drizzle and fog the weather served up. They tasted herbs, vegetables and our edible flowers. Finishing touches included meeting award-winning artist Toby Rabinowitz and getting to see some of her work. Click here for pictures.


ORGANIC FARM TRANSITIONING TO ECO-CERT CANADA

Jessica Fogarty, an Organic Inspector for ECO-CERT CANADA was at the farm for her first visit on Sunday, August 30th as part of the farm’s organic certification process. She was also on her way to visit a blueberry processing plant in Indian Bay. First she reviewed The Organic Farm’s log and binder with Mike Rabinowitz, Co-Owner and Alice Nossereau, Administrative Manager. Maintaining the log is the most challenging part of the certification. The evidence presented for certification includes but is not limited to: farm map and crop rotation records, evidence of seed search for organic and untreated seeds with sample seed packages, soil inputs for each garden and greenhouse, sources of organic inputs, with bag labels or letters to verify along with harvest and sales record to ensure traceability. Following this, Mike and Jessica had a walk-a-bout of the various gardens, greenhouses and irrigation systems, including the irrigation and water sources for the fields and greenhouses.


THIS SEASON WE HAVE MORE TROMBONCINO THAN ANY OTHER SEASON

To learn more about this unusual and versatile squash, use this link.


WE SUPPORT FRESH AND LOCAL!

Because the Organic Farm pops up so easily on Google, we are often the first contact for someone looking for organic food, especially people planning to move into the province. This may include looking for range free eggs and chickens as well as pork, beef or lamb. Imagine their surprise when they learn that unlike British Columbia, Ontario and the other Atlantic provinces, local, organic food is relatively non-existent in Newfoundland. When I explain that the food labeled as organic is likely to be imported from out of province, they find it hard to believe. However, I go on to explain that Newfoundland and Labrador does have wonderful fresh and local food in various regions of the province, including Labrador, and that several farmers are converting more to what is termed naturally grown or naturally raised – raised without herbicides, pesticides or chemical fertilizers.

The best approach is to talk with farmers themselves about the particulars of their production practices. Here is the link to the “fresh and local” guide to the Avalon Peninsula (http://avalonfresh.ca/) as well as a PDF format map of locations in the Avalon.


SEASON IS WINDING DOWN!

Onions, potatoes, cucumbers and tomatoes are still available for another few weeks. The peppers and eggplant have been less productive but are coming in somewhat in the Fall sun. Last season, we had a half dozen wheelbarrows of winter squash and pumpkin, taking two days to pick, clean and sort; enough for all 75 members of the Veggie Coop to have a winter squash, pumpkin or both in October. This year, it is slim pickings as my Dad would say. Mike, Owner/Manager thinks he know why we had a crop failure in that particular garden and says it is sometimes the only way to learn.

What else?

The crops that tolerate colder weather – kale, chard, lettuce, herbs, etc. should be available over the winter as we re-seed greenhouses with winter crops. Also crops grown in the sprout room (sprouts, pea shoots, micro-greens and wheatgrass) will be available throughout the winter. We then start up again in March with a Spring crop.

BOTTOM LINE – STAY TUNED. IT AIN’T OVER ‘TIL IT’S OVER!